EASY CIDER BRINED ROASTED PORK TENDERLOIN AND APPLE SKILLET

Easy Cider Brined Roasted Pork Tenderloin and Apple Skillet with Maple Mustard Glaze, and Shallots is extra juicy and flavorful. While it’s easy enough to make for a weeknight dinner, it’s impressive enough to serve for a special occasion!

HOW LONG TO ROAST PORK TENDERLOIN

In this recipe, first sear the pork in the skillet. This will give the meat an appealing crust and browned exterior and will lend flavor to the skillet in the form of fond. Here are couple things to keep in mind:

  • Make sure your skillet is blazing hot and make sure your pork is totally dry. That will give you the best color, and the meat will not stick to the skillet. Turn it after several minutes, then every minute or two for 6 to 8 minutes.
  • Also, make sure that the oven is fully preheated before the skillet goes in. In this one I used a 400 degree oven.
  • Roast the pork for 12 to 15 minutes.

WHAT INTERNAL TEMPERATURE TO COOK ROASTED PORK TENDERLOIN

  • Here’s the problem: Pork tenderloin is not symmetrical. It is skinny on one end and fat on the other end. So poor little skinny end will be cooked though sooner. The National Pork Board recommends that you cook pork to 145 degreed F, then rest it for 3 minutes. But if you were to do that, the skinny end would be total sawdust.
  • When I was testing this recipe, I had better luck pulling the pork out earlier than that, and letting it rest on a platter tented with foil for 10 minutes. That gave me a nice slightly rosy interior on the thicker end, and more well done pieces on the tail end. Keep in mind a couple things, I temped it at a couple different spots. At narrower spots it was indeed at 145. At the tip it was even hotter. But at the very thickest part it was 136. I pulled it, put it on a heavy platter to hold in the heat and tented it with foil. I let it rest for a full 10 minutes.
  • Note: Make sure you know where the sensor is in your thermometer. Some of them are deceptive and the sensor is actually an inch up from the tip!
  • My advice is this: If you are concerned, feel free to go by the guidelines set out by the FSIS, and cook it to 145. Consuming undercooked meat puts you at risk for food born illness.

WHY DO YOU REST ROASTED PORK TENDERLOIN AND FOR HOW LONG

  • Because pork tenderloin is incredibly lean it is really important to let it rest after it is roasted. I think it is better to let it rest for a full 10 minutes on a nice heavy platter with foil over it. That will ensure that there will be carry-over heat that will continue to cook it through. See above about internal temps.
  • When you cook meat the muscle fibers (yes that is what meat is, sorry to burst your bubble if you didn’t know that) denature and seize up. If you were to cut into the meat right when it came out of the pan and those fibers were still taught, then the juice held within would flow right out onto the carving board. Resting allows the muscle fibers to relax again and the juices stay inside when the meat is sliced.
  • Rest smaller cuts of pork, such as pork chops that are 1-inch thick or less for 3 minutes. Thicker cuts, such as this Easy Roasted Pork Tenderloin and Apple Skillet should be rested for longer. Up to 10 minutes. Pork loin roasts can be rested for 15 to 20 minutes.

WHAT TO SERVE WITH EASY ROASTED PORK TENDERLOIN AND APPLE SKILLET

The flavors in this easy roasted pork tenderloin and apple skillet are sweet and savory with a splash of acidity from apple cider vinegar- so it pairs well with simple earthy flavors.

For this meal it was a combination of potatoes, brussels sprouts, apple sauce, and an apple gravy. I have tried this recipe along side both mashed and potatoes. I also made simple steamed brussels sprouts with olive oil, salt and pepper.

EASY CIDER BRINED ROASTED PORK TENDERLOIN AND APPLE SKILLET

  • PREP TIME: 20 min
  • COOK TIME: 17 min
  • TOTAL TIME: 37 min
  • CATEGORY: Main Course
  • METHOD: Skillet Roasting
  • CUISINE: American

Description

Easy Cider Brined Roasted Pork Tenderloin and Apple Skillet with Maple Mustard Glaze, and Shallots is extra juicy and flavorful. While it’s easy enough to make for a weeknight dinner, it’s impressive enough to serve for a special occasion!

Ingredients

Brine

  • ½ cup kosher salt
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 1 cup unsweetened apple cider, or juice
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 5 teaspoons chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons smoked paprika

Pork

  • 1 pork tenderloin
  • ⅓ cup pure maple syrup, preferably dark robust
  • 2 tablespoons whole grain prepared mustard
  • 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon avocado oil or canola oil
  • 4 shallots, peeled and quartered
  • 2 large apples, peeled, cored and cut into large wedges
  • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Gravy

  • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup unsweetened apple cider, or juice
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 2 to 3 teaspoons honey, to taste
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced rosemary
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

Brine

  1. In a small pot set over medium heat, combine the kosher salt, honey, apple cider, apple cider vinegar, chili powder, and paprika. Stir until the salt just dissolves. Remove from heat and allow to cool completely.
  2. Once cool, pour brine into an extra-large, freezer-thickness plastic baggie. Add pork loin. Squeeze air out of bag and seal to shut. Place inside a large bowl or pan (in case of leaks) and refrigerate for 2 - 24 hours. Flip bag at least a couple of times throughout the brining time.
  3. Remove pork loin from the refrigerator at least a half hour before you’re ready to cook so that it may come to room temperature. Adjust the rack in the center position.

Pork

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Stir maple syrup, mustard and cider vinegar in a small bowl.
  3. Heat oil in a large oven-proof skillet over high heat. Add pork and cook, turning after a few minutes, then every minute or two until browned on all sides, 6 to 8 minutes total. Add shallots and apples and sprinkle with salt & pepper to taste.
  4. Transfer the skillet to the oven, and let roast until the apples are browning on the bottom, about 5 minutes. Remove the skillet from the oven, stir shallot and apple mixture and drizzle the maple mixture all over the pork and apple mixture. Return the skillet to the oven and roast, stirring the apple mixture and turning the pork occasionally, until the pork registers 136 to 145 degrees F when tested with an instant read thermometer in the thickest part of the tenderloin, 12 to 15 minutes.
  5. Remove the pork to a carving board or heavy platter and tent with foil. Let rest 10 minutes. Slice on a slight bias into ½-inch thick medallions. Serve the pork with the apples and shallots and any juices from the skillet.

Gravy

  1. While the pork is resting, make the pan sauce by spooning 3 tablespoons of pan juices into a medium saucepan set over medium heat.
  2. Stir in flour and whisk continuously for 1 minute.
  3. Slowly and gradually whisk in the apple cider and chicken broth, continuously stirring so that sauce becomes smooth.
  4. Bring to a boil while stirring and then reduce heat to medium.
  5. Stir in apple cider vinegar, honey, rosemary, cayenne, salt, and pepper.
  6. Cook, stirring frequently, until sauce is thickened and reduced, which will probably take from 5 to 10 minutes.
  7. Remove saucepan from heat, stir in cream, and adjust seasonings, to taste.

NOTES

  • The USDA recommends that Americans cook pork to an internal temperature of 145 degrees F, followed by a rest of 3 minutes. Consuming undercooked meat puts you at risk for food born illness.
  • Once the pork tenderloin initially goes into the oven, I prefer leaving the layer of fat attached and cooking the meat with the fat side up, so that the fat can melt down during roasting process and adds moisture to the meat.
  • If you prefer a thicker gravy you can add more flour to the mixture. I recommend adding only small amounts, ½ teaspoon at a time. Can always add more, can’t take it out once it’s in though.

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